EMPLOYMENT, YOUTH AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

EMPLOYMENT, YOUTH AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Productive engagement: Human beings need to be productive. In modern society, for most of us, that means having a job for which we have appropriate skills and that also offers us some stimulation and challenge and the opportunity to advance our careers.

Most of us also work, of course, because we need to earn enough money to pay for shelter, food, clothes, education, health and the other requisites we regard as necessary for a reasonable life. So, providing sufficient opportunities for all people to be gainfully employed is extremely important.

At the same time, it is necessary to recognise that life should not be about work alone. We need other activities in our life and even “non-activities” such as rest. There are also those who do not aspire to reach high career levels or attain large material wealth. For some, their focus is more about how they can contribute to society as a whole or to assisting those of particular disadvantage.

We therefore need a flexible approach as to how we see work as a part of society as well as how individual employers and employees engage with one another in a fair and equitable way. (RH)

As long as someone is able and willing to contribute to society, they should be supported. If they choose to live off the system and not contribute, then they should be set free to find their own way, without taxpayer support. This is particularly applicable in the Arts sector.

Youth: I want to see young entrepreneurs growing and blossoming as future leaders, business people and caretakers of our society and culture.

We must encourage, nurture and mentor them through this process and not simply leave them to make “decisions on the run”.

“As long as someone is able and willing to contribute to society, they should be supported. If they choose to live off the system and not contribute, then they should be set free to find their own way, without taxpayer support”

Whilst they have the intellect, inspiration, “qualifications” and enthusiasm, the young do not have the same life and business experience as older Australians.

A mentoring and volunteer system by mature Australians to help the young and inexperienced in this regard would not only help to narrow the generation gap, it would be of immense mutual benefit to all involved.

Baby Boomers would be the perfect mentors because of their lifetime of experience and accumulated knowledge. This would also give unemployed Baby Boomers a purpose and direction…and help to raise their self esteem.

Financial loans (low or no interest), grants and other financial support such as not charging income tax for the first year, would also aid in getting projects and enterprises off the ground and keep them on Australian soil.

(See more on this on the Taxation and Small Business pages.)

“Whilst they have the intellect, inspiration, “qualifications” and enthusiasm, youth do not have the same life and business experience as older Australians”